Ex-Pistons

Discussion in 'Pistons and NBA' started by jzchen, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. G-man

    G-man Starter

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  2. NYPistonFan729

    NYPistonFan729 Bench Warmer Forum Donor

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    And because he is living in his own little world, he probably thought that many teams would dismiss his behavior due to Curry and the problems with minutes with Hamilton. AI has always been a great player, but his attitude has always been his worst enemy. He probably has gotten offers, but he cannot fathom making the MLE or less.
  3. coynejeremy

    coynejeremy All-Star Administrator 1x Fantasy Champion Forum Donor

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  4. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Rodman's a Stiff..

    Please call the cops if you see anyone carrying a 7-foot-tall statue of Dennis Rodman - Newsday.com - Chicago Norm

    "Townshend, Vt. - Vermont State Police are investigating the theft of a 7-foot-tall bronze statue of former Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons star Dennis Rodman.

    Kenneth Moberly of Wardsboro told police he bought the statue at a charity auction for the Grace Cottage Hospital in Townshend on Saturday and asked that it be delivered to his home, but that it never arrived.

    The 70-year-old Moberly tells The Associated Press he's never been a serious basketball fan and bid on the statue solely as a piece of art. Rodman played for several National Basketball Association teams, and was known for his tough play, frequently changing hair color and numerous tattoos and piercings. He's also been in movies and professional wrestling."

    http://www.newsday.com/blogs/sports...tall-bronze-statue-of-dennis-rodman-1.1352387
  5. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Rotate This..

    What can depth do for you, Part Two: Flip Saunders' "eight-man rotation" SBNation - Bullets Forever - Mike Prada

    "We should all be well aware that when Flip Saunders says he likes an eight-man rotation, he doesn't really mean he'll only play eight guys. Every coach will always create scrap minutes for the rest of the roster to deal with foul trouble and the like, and Flip's no exception. Injuries also happen, and no team, particularly this one, should take health for granted.

    But even with all those disclaimers, it's safe to say that we'll see less tinkering from Flip Saunders than we saw from Eddie Jordan. If Eddie Jordan is the guy who loves multi-tooled players that can be ready to do their thing no matter their minutes, Flip ties players down to specific roles and minute allotments to preserve consistency with the team. Let's be clear: Flip's approach is a good thing. Sure, roles may become inflexible, but consistent rotations breed consistent play.

    The interesting part about this is that the Wizards' depth has been highly-touted. Michael Lee called this team the deepest Wizards club of the decade. An eight-man rotation means only two of Nick Young, JaVale McGee, Andray Blatche, DeShawn Stevenson, Fabricio Oberto, Dominic McGuire and Javaris Crittenton will play regular minutes this year.

    So I ask this question again. What good is depth if only eight guys will soak up most of the minutes anyway?

    Clearly, there are some indirect positives of having a strong 9-12 on your roster. Preventing and accounting for injuries in the top eight, competition in practice, etc. That stuff matters. But it matters less than having a really strong top eight. Compared to the teams we're trying to chase, we just don't have the horses at the top.

    Even if Gilbert Arenas comes back healthy, the Arenas-Caron Butler-Antawn Jamison trio doesn't compare to Paul Pierce-Kevin Garnett-Ray Allen-Rajon Rondo, Dwight Howard-Vince Carter-Rashard Lewis-Jameer Nelson or even LeBron himself. Brendan Haywood is underrated as hell, but he's not Dwight Howard, is about as good as Kendrick Perkins and can't beat Cleveland's Ilgauskas-Shaq-Varejao threesome by himself. Mike Miller and Randy Foye are good complimentary guys, but they can't make up for the big gaps in starpower here. Hell, you can legimitately argue that they aren't as good as guys like Mickael Pietrus, Rasheed Wallace, Jamario Moon, Delonte West, Anthony Parker, etc.

    The positive way to look at reconciling the depth vs. tight rotation dichotomy is to suggest that a tight, balanced eight-man rotation can maximize everyone's strengths. You could look at Flip's Detroit teams, who got by on several good players playing together without dwarfing each other's minutes, as evidence here. But that same case study falls short in a sense because, for all their depth, they ran into teams with more starpower and better players than what Flip and the intangible whole-is-better-than-sum factor could make up.

    Maximizing the top-level talent on this team must be the priority. It doesn't pay to have our 9-12 guys be so strong in order to have overall roster depth when that 9-12 group could be used to upgrade the top eight. And in this case, it can be. Take a promising youngster who might not crack our tight rotation here (Nick Young, Crittenton, one of Blatche/McGee maybe), combine him with expiring contracts (MikeJames, even Foye or Miller), and you can find yourself someone to upgrade the top eight. (You could have taken a similar package and gotten something better than Foye/Miller, but I digress). The longer you wait to decide who to package, the more those 9-12 guys don't play, and the lower their trade value. It doesn't pay to wait.

    Point here is, at a certain point, excessive depth is unnecessary. The 9-12 guys don't matter, and they especially don't matter on a Flip Saunders-coached team. Excessive depth needs to be used to upgrade your top-level talent, or it needs to be used as insurance in case you need to dip into your top eight to upgrade your top eight. That depth needs to be parlayed into top-level talent as soon as possible, because the longer that depth sits on the bench, the lower its trade value sinks."

    What can depth do for you, Part Two: Flip Saunders' "eight-man%rotation" - Bullets Forever
  6. roscoe36

    roscoe36 All-Star Administrator

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    Interesting that Flip has an eight man rotation as part of his style. People here always suspected he just hated his bench players.
  7. brofmfa

    brofmfa Bench Warmer Forum Donor

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    Eight men rotation could mean he hates his bench players no matter who they are.
  8. LA Dre

    LA Dre All-Star 1x Fantasy Champion Forum Donor

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    OK this thread was started by JZ almost two years ago to pretty much dog our favorite former Pistons.

    So who is responsible for going through this thread to delete all references to Ben Wallace being an ex-Piston??:sssh::nerd2:
  9. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Flip Teaching Arenas to Play "D"?

    Saunders looks to change Wizards' future by clinging fast to his past - Steve Aschburner - Inside The NBA - CNNSI

    "The newly sworn-in Commander In Chief created a stir back in February when he dropped by the Verizon Center and planted himself courtside, eschewing a suite upstairs that would have made happier all those dark-suited guys sporting shades, ear pieces and lapel pins. President Obama was there to see his hometown club, the Chicago Bulls, not the NBA team that represents the city in which he currently works and resides.

    That's something new Washington Wizards coach Flip Saunders wants to change. Baseball struck out trying to talk Obama out of his White Sox warm-up jacket at the All-Star Game a few weeks ago -- he was, after all, throwing out the first pitch in Cardinals-crazed St. Louis -- but Saunders figures he can win over the President. Literally.

    "I think I'm just going to challenge him to play me in 1-on-1," Saunders said. "Now he's a lot younger than me [actually, Saunders is 54, Obama just turned 48] and he's building a court over there. But if I beat him, he's going to have to go with the Wizards."

    And if Obama's youth, game and White House-court advantage bests Saunders, a four-year starting point guard at the University of Minnesota back in the day? Might he double, say, his tax contributions to this administration's pet programs? "I think I'm already doing that," Saunders said, laughing.

    There always is the outside chance that the Wizards might convince our nation's No. 1 fan to switch allegiance on merit. "Hope" and "Change you can believe in," no longer needed on the political trail, are available as marketing slogans, and Saunders has signed on for four years and $18 million as head coach and campaign manager. That doesn't mean we'll be seeing Gilbert Arenas getting the Shepard Fairey-poster treatment anytime soon. But it does mean the Wizards are planning one of the swiftest and impressive turnarounds in recent league history. Merely by showing up.

    Washington finished 19-53 last season; only Sacramento (17-55) won fewer games. The Wizards ranked 25th in scoring (96.1), 23rd in field-goal percentage (45.0), 29th from three-point range (33.0), 25th in assists (20.01), 24th in points allowed (103.5), 29th in defensive field-goal percentage (48.2) and last in defensive rebounding (28.41). Attendance was a mediocre 16,613 and the team's streak of playoff appearances ended at four.

    But Arenas, the team's star, missed all but two (ill-advised) games while recovering from knee surgery, after missing 69 the season before. Center Brendan Haywood returned in April to play just six games after tearing a wrist ligament in training camp. Back problems cost off guard DeShawn Stevenson 50 games and finally required surgery in March. There were assorted ailments to Caron Butler, Juan Dixon and others, but Arenas, Haywood and Stevenson qualified as the Wizards' Banged-Up Three.

    "Those are three starters on a team that had been the No. 4 or 5 seed in the Eastern Conference when they were healthy," Saunders said. "Now you're adding a Mike Miller, a Randy Foye and a Fabricio Oberto, so from the team last year, you're bringing in six guys who, the last time they played, were all starters. You're a much deeper team and you're adding them to two guys [Butler and Antawn Jamison] who were basically All-Stars."

    Allocating the minutes will be Saunders' job, same as navigating the irrepressible Arenas. The Wizards guard's strong personality and, some would say, spotty discipline could make him a potential problem for a head coach known more as a facilitator than a dictator in his player relations. Or it could make Saunders, beyond his offensive leanings, the perfect go-along, get-along guy for Arenas.

    "In all my years, I don't think I've been around anyone who's as much of a basketball junkie as he is," Saunders said of Agent Zero. "That guy wants to work on his game 24/7. He's got an unbelievable passion for the game. What happens, because of how much he loves to play, when he's been injured, he hasn't always wanted to go through the [rehab] process. He's wanted to skip it, jump right back and do too much. Now, because of missing this last year, he understands and has gone through the process to get stronger."

    Arenas isn't a prototypical Saunders' point guard -- he ranked fourth, fourth and fifth in shots taken in his last three healthy seasons -- but the coach has adapted through the years. Without a Terrell Brandon on the roster, he has to accept the often-mercurial star. "[Arenas is] a combination of every one of them," Saunders said. "He's got great size, so he can do things in the post like Sam [Cassell] and Chauncey [Billups] can. He's got unbelievable range similar to Chauncey and Steph [Marbury] to a point. He's got great ability to get to the basket, which was Steph's forte.''

    Saunders is even talking about challenging Arenas to be a top defender, something he apparently got away from since leaving Arizona. "We've been very open in how we've dealt," he said. "I've dealt with lots of types of characters. But even when I've had a run-in with somebody, I've been able to get those guys to play at a high level.

    "Guys know that I have their best interest at heart. You don't have to be confrontational with a guy if he's doing what you ask him to do. Did I have some confrontations with Rasheed [Wallace]? Yes. He wasn't maybe doing things I thought needed to be done for the team. But to this day, Sam did everything I asked. For the first time in his career, he went through every two-a-day in camp, which he had never done before. We gave him a medal when he did it."

    What Saunders is promising the Wizards is an opportunity to win more than 19, a turn with the NBA's fattest playbook and a chance to carve out niches. "We have great depth but we really don't have duplicate players," he said. "Everyone brings something different to the table."

    That means Arenas as the offensive initiator, Jamison as a solid if undersized power forward and Butler as a dangerous wing player with room to grow defensively, too. It means Stevenson as maybe the team's best on-ball defender -- if he doesn't antagonize LeBron James into heroics -- and Haywood, Oberto, Andray Blatche and JaVale McGee as possible Dwight Howard-counters. It means Miller and Foye as scoring threats who can thrive in Saunders' ball-movement sets and make opponents' pay for doubling the established Big Three.

    For Saunders, this is a chance to make up for a second firing; his three seasons in Detroit ended after three trips to the Eastern Conference finals but no NBA Finals. He has a 587-396 record in the regular season and a 47-51 mark in 11 postseason appearances. For all the lofty promises that traditionally come out of Washington, no one is predicting a Wizards championship. But based on what has happened in Minnesota and Detroit since he got axed, Saunders looks better every day. "You become more entrenched in your philosophy that what you did, you did the right way," he said.

    Saunders isn't alone in his belief. This fall Cassell will join his former coach, sitting a seat or two down from him as a first-year assistant coach. It seems a little daffy, given Sam-I-Am's penchant for filtering every team goal through his own personal prism. Cassell switched teams seven times in his 16-year playing career, chafing his way off most of them. But Saunders isn't the only one of Cassell's former coaches who has seen sideline potential in him (while keeping a bottle of aspirin handy).

    "He's not afraid to challenge players," Saunders said. "Sam's been there, so he has credibility. He didn't play because of his 'superior athletic ability' -- he played because he was smart, he knew angles. He can harness that and show players how to be more cerebral. A lot of guys don't like playing zone because it's not macho; Sam knew pick-and-rolls are tough to guard. He didn't let his ego get in the way of taking something away that the other team wants to do."

    At least contract disputes shouldn't be an issue anymore. "Listen, the guy has put in a lot of time this summer," Saunders said. "He's worked with players individually. He's flown out to California. He did a really good job in Vegas coaching a couple of our games there. He can deliver my message to the players, but I'm also not afraid to tell him to shut up."

    In fact, the Wizards are one of the growing number of NBA teams that put their assistant coaches off-limits to the media. Good luck with that, trying to muzzle Sam Cassell. Then again, if it's a filibuster you want, he's now in the right town for it.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/steve_aschburner/08/07/saunders.wizards/index.html?eref=T1#ixzz0NgxcCyQQ
  10. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Billups Intervention

    Billups Giving Smith An Assist
    Chris Tomasson - HoopsHype.com

    "Chauncey Billups isn’t worried about his Denver Nuggets not picking up any big-name players this offseason. But he is worried about a teammate who hasn’t exactly been helping his name lately.

    With that in mind, Billups will fly Sunday to Las Vegas, where embattled guard JR Smith has relocated. Billups will spent the final three weeks of August working out with and mentoring Smith.

    “We’ve got some talking to do,’’ Billups said in an interview with HoopsHype.com.

    Smith last month spent 24 days in jail after pleading guilty to reckless driving in connection with a 2007 automobile accident in which a friend, Andre Bell, died.

    More controversy surfaced after his release. The Denver Post reported there were posts on Smith’s Twitter page written in a way commonly associated with the Bloods street gang. It was reported that Smith, who since has shut down his Twitter page, wrote words with a “C’’ that were replaced with a “K’’ and, if the word contained both those letters, the “C’’ was removed.

    “JR’s a work in progress,’’ Billups said. “I’m happy and proud of the progress that he’s made. But the latest thing with the Twitter. That’s immaturity. It’s immature. Those are mistakes that we’ve got to stop him from making. We’ve got to spend some time.’’

    Billups, Denver’s point guard, figures to start in the backcourt next season alongside Smith. That is, unless Nuggets coach George Karl, who said at the end of last season Smith was in line to replace the since-departed Dahntay Jones as the starting shooting guard, deems Smith still not mature enough for that role.

    Billups can help knock some sense into Smith, 23, who has had numerous issues on and off the court since entering the NBA in 2004.

    “I hope so,’’ Billups said of Smith becoming his starting backcourt mate. “I hope that he can make the right progressions and be more consistent and be more reliable at all times on the court. If he does, he’s one of the most talented guys I’ve ever played with. So he’s on his way to being an All-Star, if he does.’’

    If Smith, who averaged 15.2 points last season and was runner-up to Dallas guard Jason Terry for the NBA Sixth Man Award, can take another step, Denver also can. While other teams in the Western Conference have been beefing up this offseason, the Nuggets mostly have been on the sideline.

    The Nuggets, who fell 4-2 to the Los Angeles Lakers in a hard-fought West final, have watched as the Lakers picked up Ron Artest. They’ve looked on as San Antonio added Richard Jefferson and AntonioMcDyess, Portland got Andre Miller and Dallas added Shawn Marion.

    In addition to the re-signing of center Chris Andersen, what have been the Nuggets’ moves this offseason? They picked up rookie point guard Ty Lawson on draft night and have acquired guard Arron Afflalo and forward Malik Allen, who had NBA scoring averages last season of 4.9 and 3.2 points, respectively.

    “A lot of teams obviously got better before we even jump the ball up,’’ Billups said. “I think that our situation stays the same. But the way we get better is, just with the exception of myself, (Anthony Carter) and Kenyon (Martin), we’ve got a young basketball team. I think just the experience we got as a young team, being elite, having some success, if we can be a little more focused mentally, I think we get better.

    “It’s not always about names and pickups. You still got to allow those teams to mesh. We’ve meshed. I don’t put much stock in it, although there are a lot of teams that got better… With us, it’s being a year smarter, a year better.’’

    Billups believes the Nuggets “definitely’’ have what it takes now to be a championship contender. He’ll get no argument from Martin, who also isn’t too concerned about the Nuggets not having made a marquee move this offseason.

    “I still feel like we have the best team,” Martin said. “We didn’t win (the title), but in my heart (the Nuggets are the NBA’s best team)… The only thing that we could use is a drop-dead shooter. Just a drop-dead shooter. Other than that, we’ve got a great team.’’

    The Nuggets really will need another outside shooter if restricted free-agent forward Linas Kleiza bolts. Kleiza has received a $2.7 million qualifying offer from Denver, which would allow him to become an unrestricted free agent next summer. But indications are Kleiza wants more money, and he might have to travel far to get it.

    Kleiza, who told the since-shuttered Rocky Mountain News last October that playing overseas in 2009-10 was a realistic possibility, might go through with that. He’s being courted by teams in Greece and Spain, much to the chagrin of Billups.

    “We need LK,’’ Billups said. “But, at the same time, if he has offers, I’m never going to tell somebody what’s best for them and their own situation. But we need LK back.’’

    Billups also wants back his backup point guard. Billups said it’s “huge’’ that Carter returns, calling him “one of the keys to our team.’’

    But Carter, an unrestricted free agent who has been offered a one-year, $1.3 million minimum contract by the Nuggets, is seeking a multi-year deal. So far, though, there hasn’t been a lot of interest.

    “I hope so,’’ Carter said of whether he will return to Denver.

    Asked to comment specifically on his contract negotiations, Carter said he’s “not talking about that.’’ But Carter, sounding optimistic about a return, did say he’s hopeful of getting a deal done by mid-August.

    “We’ve got the whole core back,’’ said Carter, apparently counting himself. “We’ve just got to pick up where we left off last year. Last year was a great learning experience for us because K-Mart and Chauncey were the only two who had ever been that far (a conference final).’’

    Speaking of learning, how much of that will Smith do once Billups has three weeks with him? That could be end up being more important for the Nuggets than bringing in a big-name player."

    HoopsHype.com NBA Blogs - Chris Tomasson » Billups giving Smith an assist
  11. dba

    dba All-Star Moderator 1x Fantasy Champion Forum Donor

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    Re: Billups Intervention

    Let the guy with "issues" move to Las Vegas - that's smart.



    I do admire what CB is trying to do. It's a good thing and not many other players put themselves in a position to help a fellow player. On the other hand, does he have to talk about it in an interview?
  12. Nemo

    Nemo The Great Predictor Forum Donor

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    Very nice piece about Flip Saunders...thanks...
  13. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Stack gets Stuffed

    John Wall dunks on Jerry Stackhouse in a bad, bad way
    Eamonn Brennan - Rivals.com (VIDEO)

    "Happy Monday, Dagger readers. Mondays are usually no fun. But this Monday sort of rules, I think.

    You know what makes Mondays awesome sometimes? When video of Kentucky superrecruit John Wall dunking on NBA veteran Jerry Stackhouse -- who, though he's lost is a step in recent years, is no athletic slouch -- hits my inbox. That's a good Monday.

    That video was shot at the Greater North Carolina Pro-Am, one of the many summer leagues that mingle college and NBA stars for offseason workouts. This is where I want to urge Jerry Stackhouse to never go back, but you know what? It happens. LeBron James got dunked on by a far less talented player than John Wall. At least Stackhouse's people didn't pull a Politburo on the footage.

    Stackhouse handled it appropriately, inbounding the ball and hustling back down the court. And anyway, he shouldn't feel too bad. John Wall is going to do that to a lot of people in the next few years. At least Stackhouse can say he was first.

    Here's the tape..
    John Wall dunks on Jerry Stackhouse in a bad, bad way - The Dagger - NCAA Hoops - Rivals.com
  14. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Five You'd Like to Play Alongside
    Matt Steinmetz - Fan House

    "If Ron Artest is a wild card when it comes to chemistry, and Allen Iverson is a tough guy to play alongside of, then who are the NBA's best teammates? Let's talk glue guys this a.m.

    Here's one guy's Top 5 Teammates list -- players you want to play with.

    Shane Battier: His "glue-guy" hype has now superseded his actual "glue-guy" game. That just means Battier has become a little overrated in this area. But Battier still belongs here.

    Chauncey Billups: What more proof do you need? Billups goes to Denver, and immediately the Nuggets take the next step in the postseason and advance to the conference finals. His former team, the Pistons, goes downhill, barely secure the eighth playoff spot and get swept in the first round of the playoff. That's Elmer's right there.

    Tim Duncan: You don't often think of superstars as glue guys, but Duncan's not your ordinary superstar. As Duncan begins winding down, you just know he's going to stay classy till the end and go out the right way. Just can't see him complaining about a lack of touches as he pushes 35.

    Lamar Odom: Who could blame Odom if he was a player who wanted the ball more and/or a bigger role in general? But that's just not him. All the while Odom was criticized early in his career for not being assertive enough, turns out he was just perfecting the art of being a role player.

    Rasheed Wallace: It rarely gets recognized because it has to take a backseat to his temper, but Wallace is among the league's most unselfish players. Whether it's making the extra pass, defending one of the opposing team's best players or taking a hard foul, Wallace will do what he has to do. Very few players in the league with his skill level perform the intangibles like Wallace."

    Five You'd Like to Play Alongside -- NBA FanHouse
  15. TaS

    TaS All-Star Forum Donor

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    I see that Hoopshype has the salaries for Dyess and Sheed exactly the same for next year ($5.854M).

    I take it they are just guessing.

    Any word on what our ex Pistons signed for?
  16. lk#1

    lk#1 First Round Draft Pick

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    Antonio McDyess:

    09-10: $4,500,000
    10-11: $4,860,000
    11-12: $5,220,000
    Third year is $2,640,000 guaranteed until July 1st 2011. 10% trade kicker

    I found it on other forum so i can't guarantee tthat the numbers are correct.
  17. TaS

    TaS All-Star Forum Donor

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    Seems like a lot, given his age and all.

    If that's true, then good for him. He's probably worth every penny of it this year, but after that, he's getting a good deal I would say.
  18. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    Seriously, who'd a thunk it?

    Tip-Off Timer: Lindsey Hunter, NBA's Oldest Player, Born in '70Ex-Piston
    Matt Watson - Fan House

    "Whether he realizes it or not, Lindsey Hunter became the answer to a trivia question this summer: he's now the oldest player under contract in the NBA. Hunter was born on December 3, 1970, which means there are exactly zero players left in the NBA born in the 1960s. Dikembe Mutombo, who turned 43 in June, was previously the NBA's elder statesman, but he's now a free agent, after suffering a serious knee injury in April, he announced his intentions to retire.

    To put into context just how long his Hunter's career has spanned, he shared the court with Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars and Bill Laimbeer as a rookie. He was the 11th overall pick of the 1993 draft, behind the likes of Chris Webber, Shawn Bradley, Penny Hardaway and Jamal Mashburn, all of whom are long since retired.

    Sam Cassell, 39, was technically employed by the Celtics and Kings last season but didn't play a single minute, and he joined Flip Saunders' staff as an assistant coach in Washington before he had a chance to take the torch from Mutombo. He followed in the footsteps of Darrell Armstrong, 41, who last played in 2007-08 before joining Rick Carlisle's staff as a rookie assistant coach in Dallas last season.

    It's always possible that Robert Horry, who turns 39 later this month, or P.J. Brown, who turns 40 in October, could latch on with a contender and bump Hunter down a notch, but they've each been out of the game for over a year.

    Drafted as the heir to Isiah Thomas' throne, Hunter didn't quite live up to those initial expectations but obviously carved out a successful NBA career. He's won two NBA titles, his first as a part-time starter for the 2002 Lakers followed by another during his second stint with the Pistons in 2004.

    Hunter was reportedly contemplating retirement in 2006 -- but that was three years and three contracts ago. After signing with the Bulls last summer, he re-signed a for the veteran's minimum last month. He's averaged 8.6 points per game over his career and is still one of the better on-the-ball defenders in the NBA, although the Bulls likely brought him back to continue his role as a mentor for Derrick Rose more so than his playing ability.

    Whenever Hunter decides to hang them up, Bruce Bowen, who turned 38 in June, is next in line for "oldest player" honors."

    Tip-Off Timer: Lindsey Hunter, NBA's Oldest Player, Born in '70 -- NBA FanHouse
  19. G-man

    G-man Starter

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    No Answer - Just a Question Mark...

    Is any NBA team still searching for the Answer?
    Adrian Wojnarowski - Yahoo Sports

    "Suddenly, Larry Brown is playing clearinghouse for Allen Iverson’s character and coachability.

    The calls from curious front-office executives about Iverson, Brown says, are coming to him. For everything that Charlotte’s coach implies has been misunderstood about A.I.’s disastrous season with the Detroit Pistons, Brown sounds as disingenuous as ever while making the case for the NBA’s most fascinating unsigned free agent.

    No one is making calls on Allen Iverson. No one. Why? They all know the answers about The Answer.

    If your team’s a contender, Iverson proved with the Pistons that he wants no part of fitting into a system. If you’re a bad team trying to develop young players, he’ll stunt growth. Here’s the problem: Iverson is just good enough to still be dangerous.

    So why would they call someone who worked with him six years ago, when he was a different player in a different time? As believability goes, this is like Brown’s boy wonder, John Calipari, pitching the NCAA that he had nothing to do with Derrick Rose’s SAT scores.

    Here’s why it’s so hard to believe Brown: How many calls have gone to Iverson’s most recent employer, one of the basketball’s most respected front offices?

    “Not one,” a Pistons front-office source said.

    No one has called the Pistons because there’s no mystery about Iverson. This has to be one of the most fascinating falls in modern NBA history – a $20 million-a-year player spiraling this fast without an injury, an arrest, something. He was still popular enough that fans voted him as a starter in the 2009 NBA All-Star Game. Now he’ll be fortunate to get three of the worst franchises in the NBA – Charlotte, Memphis and the Los Angeles Clippers – to offer him a modest, one-year contract.

    Iverson comes out of a different NBA, a different time, and sometimes it feels like he’s hanging around a high-school party a year or two after his graduation.

    “When he went to Detroit and showed that he couldn’t really fit into a team setup, it sent out a ‘buyer beware’ signal to everyone,” one NBA general manager said.

    The league’s financial climate is changing – and changing dramatically. Iverson used to have box-office cachet, but even in these dire economic times no team sees him as a risk-reward gamble worth the trouble. After the Pistons made the trade for him in October, there was an immediate surge in ticket sales. Nevertheless, it didn’t take long for the interest to level, and eventually Iverson became unwilling – perhaps even unable – to play a complementary role.

    Yes, Michael Curry made a mistake promising Iverson a starting job – something the deposed Pistons coach later changed course on – but the damage was done. Iverson had always been a headache, but he no longer had the game to justify a franchise’s concessions for him.

    Even so, A.I. has always been of sound mind if not sound judgment. As for Stephon Marbury, he did a much better job sacrificing his game with the Boston Celtics a season ago but has almost no chance to regain NBA employment this summer.

    “Steph has gone off the deep end,” one Western Conference GM said.

    Eventually, Iverson will get a job. Maybe it will be this week, or next, or sometime in training camp when a team must deal with an injury.

    Officials with one of his endorsers, Reebok, have told league executives they believe Iverson will eventually sign with Brown in Charlotte. That’s been A.I.’s preference too. Nevertheless, Brown has privately told associates that it seems unlikely his cash-strapped franchise could add the salary without first losing some elsewhere on the roster.

    On Twitter, Iverson has promised that a deal is near for him, but there isn’t one NBA executive, not one agent, who seems able to figure out where that’ll be. For now, Allen Iverson is 34 years old, one of the last vestiges of the immediate post-Jordan era. He is fading fast out of relevancy, and perhaps it’s fitting that another high-maintenance star no wanted anymore, Larry Brown, is trying to play revisionist history for him.

    There’s no misunderstanding why A.I. is still unemployed this late into August, no search for answers about The Answer..."

    Is any NBA team still searching for the Answer? - NBA - Yahoo! Sports
  20. TaS

    TaS All-Star Forum Donor

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    That is the amazing part. Worst all-star selection of all time perhaps? Maybe MJ in his final comeback year.

    Stat: '09AI/'03MJ
    PPG: 17.4/ 20.0
    APG: 4.9/ 3.8
    RPG: 3.1/ 6.1
    SPG: 1.6/ 1.5
    FG%: .416/ .445
    3P%: .286/ .291

    Very similar all around.

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