Who would you trade for Rubio?

Discussion in 'Pistons and NBA' started by Laimbrane, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. TWOTIMESRALPHI

    TWOTIMESRALPHI Team Captain 3x Fantasy Champion Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Vienna
    I study in spain right now and get to see alot of Rubio - this kid is the real deal, great handles, great court vision, quick, good penetration. He's just the next big thing, if he finally decides to go to the NBA. I'm on the Ricky bandwagon
     
  2. Walter

    Walter All-Star Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    4,908
    Likes Received:
    1,640
    Gender:
    Male
    Good input Ralphi.

    Perhaps we should retitle this thread to "how many SFs would you trade for Rubio?"
     
  3. Maverick

    Maverick First Round Draft Pick

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Messages:
    303
    Likes Received:
    5
    lol 2
    prince + daye or summers.
     
  4. NEPTUNEDI

    NEPTUNEDI Second Round Draft Pick

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I dont think Barcelona will be at the final four this year. they are a little bit losers as far the euroleague games
     
  5. Walter

    Walter All-Star Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    4,908
    Likes Received:
    1,640
    Gender:
    Male
    Daye is strictly a SG and Summers is a PF. Don't you read Lee's posts? :stirthepot:
     
  6. pass99

    pass99 All-Star Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    Messages:
    2,742
    Likes Received:
    417
    What is this all about? You are all authors. What is your perspective? Your narrative voice speaks to whom? In a sense, your first person is disguised as a third person. This is when the narrator writes about everything in the third person, but no scene takes place with the hero being present. Some thoughts on this mis-direction:

    [​IMG]
    Nabokov’s Lectures on Don Quixote: Introduction

    May 5, 2007
    [​IMG](cross-posted on Tilting at Windmills)



    I absolutely loved Vladimir Nabokov’s “Introduction,” the first in his six part series on Don Quixote. It begins thusly:
    We shall do our best to avoid the fatal error of looking for so-called “real life” in novels. Let us not try and reconcile the fiction of facts with the facts of fiction. Don Quixote is a fairy tale, so is Bleak House, so is Dead Souls. Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina are supreme fairy tales. But without these fairy tales the world would not be real. A masterpiece of fiction is an original world and as such is not likely to fit the world of the reader.​

    Well, that sure is lovely! Nabokov then advances his point, explaining that “real life,” if it is anything at all, “is but a piece of fiction, a tissue of statistics.” Therefore, since the notion of “real life” is in itself built on boring generalities, we should be glad that fiction does not often depict life as we understand it.
    … the more vivid a new details in a work of fiction, then the more it departs from so-called “real life,” since “real life” is the generalized epithet, the average emotion, the advertised multitude, the nonsensical world.​
    Having this dispatched with a serious bugaboo, Nabokov proceeds to consider, in brief, some introductory concerns. Here are a few of them:
    The “Where?” of Don Quixote



    Nabokov here explains that the Spain depicted in Cervantes’ book has little resemblance to the country’s actual geography:
    If [...] we examine Don Quixote’s excursions topographically, we are confronted with a ghastly muddle. I shall spare you its details and only mention the fact that throughout those adventures there is a mass of monstrous inaccuracies at every step.​
    Then that’s one thing you don’t have to worry about!
    The “When?” of the Book



    Sylvia has already posted a wonderful time line, so I won’t bother reminding you that Cervantes was a contemporary of Shakespeare, or that the Spanish Empire was at its height during his lifetime. I will, however, quote Nabokov at length on the book’s place in the history of narrative:
    What we shall witness now is the evolution of the epic form, the shedding of its metrical skin, the hoofing of its feet, a sudden fertile cross between the winged monster of the epic and the specialized prose form of entertaining narration, more or less a domesticated mammal, if I may pursue the metaphor to its lame end. The result is a fertile hybrid, a new species, the European novel.​
    As you can see, reading the lectures of a great novelist has its perks.
    The General Comments of Critics



    In the Foreword, Guy Davenport explained that one of Nabokov’s chief goals was to dispel the hyperventilating style of criticism that surrounds this novel. So he begins this section with:
    Some critics, a very vague minority long dead, have tried to prove that Don Quixote is but a stale farce. Others have maintained that Don Quixote is the greatest novel ever written. A hundred years ago one enthusiastic French critic, Saint-Beuve, called it “the Bible of Humanity.” Let us not fall under the spell of these enchanters.​
    Nabokov has little patience for this sort of talk, nor does he care to argue about whether Cervantes was as good as Shakespeare (he’s not, according the Nabokov), or whether he was a Protestant Reformer or a militant Catholic.



    In conclusion, here is a lovely snippet from the lecture’s final paragraph:
    We should, therefore, imagine Don Quixote and his squire as two little silhouettes ambling in the distance against an ample flaming sunset, and their two huge black shadows, one of them especially elongated, stretching across the open country of centuries and reaching us here.​
    One thinks of Picasso.
     
  7. coynejeremy

    coynejeremy All-Star Administrator 1x Fantasy Champion Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    6,301
    Likes Received:
    1,219
    Location:
    Georgetown, KY
  8. CarlosGallan

    CarlosGallan First Round Draft Pick

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Puerto Sagunto
    He has an out clause at the end of next season. Unfortunately for the barcelona will probably go to the NBA next year. What is also true is that Rubio prefers a transfer to a team with more tradition, or that is sensed by their declaraciones.Pero not seem a decisive reason, I think insurance will end up playing in the NBA within 1 year and Minnesota has shown be determined to wait for you to join their team and not to transfer.

    As a fan of Barcelona that has continued throughout the year over 60 games, I must say that his performance has declined in the season finale, not seriously but has disappeared in several games. The final of the Spanish basketball league to five matches was like the rest of the team worse, they trusted and lost 3-0, all but the final set after winning Euroleague and reach the final was thought they would win without effort and paid dearly.
    After 70 games this year in Europe, the first season of blonde at a very high level, next year should be expected that his talent is a regularity in the final stretch of the season. I am still confident that Ricky is the first Spanish history of bad boys, dreaming is free.
     
  9. S.J.

    S.J. All-Star Forum Donor

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,096
    Likes Received:
    351
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Argentina
    Wait a few weeks and we will see Rubio in the Spanish Basketball Team in Turkey 2010.
     

Share This Page